COVID-19 Information and Supports

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COVID-19 Clinical Assessment Centre

COVID Assessment Centre Testing

 The Erie Shores HealthCare COVID-19 Clinical Assessment Centre offers PCR tests and clinical assessments for people exhibiting COVID symptoms. Testing eligibility is based on Provincial Ministry of Health guidelines. 

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Visitor Information

Visitor Information LinkErie Shores HealthCare understands the important role family supports plays in patient-centred care. Our visitor policy works to balance the important role visitors play with the safety of patients, family and staff.

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Community Health Supports

Community Health SupportsThe Community Response and Stabilization Team (CRST) provides health supports to the most vulnerable of the Windsor-Essex community. Supports include outbreak testing, vaccinations, health assessments and wrap-around supports.

 

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CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR VACCINATION APPOINTMENT TODAY 

Click the links above for detailed information regarding Erie Shores HealthCare's COVID-19 related information, supports, and policies.


Current Erie Shores HealthCare COVID Related Statistics

(updated weekdays around 9 am)

Last Updated: January 18, 2022

 

Erie Shores HealthCare COVID-19 ASSESSMENT CENTRE (SINCE MARCH 16, 2020) 

Total # seen in the Assessment Centre 

59,760

Total # positive swabbed in the Assessment Centre   

 4,709

 7-day average positivity rate (Jan 8 - 14)

30% 

   

Erie Shores HealthCare IN-PATIENT COVID-19 CASES 

 

 Vaccinated

(2 doses) 

Not 

Vaccinated 

Current # of COVID positive inpatients being primarily treated for COVID

4 2

Current # of COVID positive inpatients NOT being primarily treated for COVID

1 0

Current # of inpatients with a COVID-19 test pending  

0

Total # of inpatients deceased in hospital from COVID-19 *Current Month 

0

 

While the risks for severe illness may be lower with Omicron than with other variants, it is far more transmissible, and hospitalizations are expected to continue to increase. placing greater pressure on our health system. Staff absenteeism is also expected to rise and affect operations in workplaces across Ontario due to Omicron infection and exposure, including in hospitals and schools.

Given increasing hospitalizations and the strain on health human resources, the Chief Medical Officer of Health is reinstating Directive #2 requiring hospitals and health care professionals to temporarily cease non-emergent and non-urgent surgeries and procedures in hospitals and in community settings so resources may be directed to.

COVID Frequently Asked Questions

What should you do if you have symptoms of COVID-19?

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you must isolate.

These symptoms include:

  • fever or chills, OR
  • cough, OR
  • shortness of breath, OR
  • decreased or loss of taste or smell, OR
two or more of:
  • runny nose or nasal congestion
  • headache
  • extreme fatigue
  • sore throat
  • muscle aches or joint pain
  • gastrointestinal symptoms (such as vomiting or diarrhea)

If you are fully vaccinated or under 12 years old, you must isolate for 5 days from when your symptoms started. If you are not fully vaccinated or are immunocompromised, you must isolate for 10 days from when your symptoms started. You can end isolation only if your symptoms are improved for at least 24 hours, you have no fever, and all public health and safety measures, such as masking and physical distancing, are followed. All household contacts must also isolate for the same duration regardless of their vaccination status. 

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should also consider informing close contacts beyond your household contacts by providing them with the link to Ontario.ca/exposed. Individuals who are eligible for a lab-based PCR test are encouraged to get tested. If an individual is ineligible for lab-based PCR testing but is symptomatic and has access to rapid antigen testing (RAT), it may be used to assess the likelihood of COVID-19. A positive rapid antigen test result in an individual that has symptoms consistent with COVID-19 is highly suggestive that the person has COVID-19.

If the individual is fully vaccinated or under 12 years of age, they are advised to self-isolate for 5 days from symptom onset and until their symptoms have improved for 24 hours (or 48 hours if they have gastrointestinal symptoms). Do not visit any high-risk settings or individuals who may be at higher risk of illness (e.g., seniors) until 10 days after symptom onset or positive rapid antigen test (whichever is earlier).

If the individual is partially vaccinated or unvaccinated, or if they are immunocompromised, they should self-isolate for 10 days from the onset of symptoms, or from the date of their test (whichever came sooner).

If you have concerns about your symptoms, contact your doctor, health care provider, or visit the Erie Shores HealthCare COVID Clinical Assessment Centre. An appointment can be booked online (/COVID19AssessmentCentre). If you develop severe symptoms requiring medical attention, such as shortness of breath or chest pain, call 911.

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19 but are feeling unwell, isolate yourself until symptoms have improved for at least 24 hours.

What should you do if you've been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19?

If you are fully vaccinated and you have no symptoms, you are advised to:
  • Self-monitor for symptoms for 10 days since you last interacted with the positive case
  • Maintain masking, physical distancing, and adherence to all other public health measures if leaving home
  • Do not visit any high-risk settings or individuals who may be at higher risk of illness (e.g., seniors) for 10 days from your last exposure
If you are immunocompromised or not fully vaccinated, you must isolate immediately for 10 days following your last exposure. If you live with an individual who has tested positive, you must self-isolate while they are isolating.

Individuals who are eligible for testing are encouraged to get tested. If you live, work, attend, volunteer, or have been admitted in a high-risk health care setting, you must get tested as soon as possible.

If you are a worker or volunteer, you must notify your employer and should not visit the high-risk setting for 10 days from your last exposure unless directed through critical infrastructure or health care guidance for early return to work.

If you test positive, what should you do?

If you are fully vaccinated, or under 12 years of age, and you test positive from a PCR, rapid molecular, or a rapid antigen test, you must isolate for 5 days from symptom onset and until your symptoms have been improving for 24 hours (or 48 hours if gastrointestinal symptoms), whichever is longer in duration. Do not visit any high-risk settings or individuals who may be at higher risk of illness (e.g., seniors) until 10 days after symptom onset or positive rapid antigen test (whichever is earlier).

If you are partially vaccinated, unvaccinated, or immunocompromised, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the onset of symptoms, or from the date of your test (whichever came sooner). In addition, household contacts of individuals who have tested positive must also self-isolate during this time. Individuals must isolate regardless of their vaccination status.

You should also notify your close contacts. A close contact is someone who had a prolonged exposure in close proximity (within two metres) to a person with COVID-19.

Who is considered a close contact?

A close contact is anyone you were less than two metres away from for at least 15 minutes, or multiple shorter lengths of time, without personal protective equipment in the 48 hours before your symptoms began or your positive test result, whichever came first.

What does self-isolating entail?

When self-isolating, you are advised to:

Stay home:

  • Do not go to work, school, or other public places;
  • Stay home unless you need to get tested or require emergency medical care; and
  • Do not use public transportation, taxis, or rideshares. •
Avoid contact with others:
  • No visitors unless essential (e.g., care providers);
  • Stay away from seniors and people with chronic medical conditions (e.g., diabetes, lung problems, immune deficiency);
  • As much as possible, stay in a separate room away from other people in your home and use a separate bathroom if you have one;
  • Make sure that shared rooms have good airflow (e.g., open windows); and
  • If these steps are not possible, keep a distance of at least 2 metres from others at all times and wear a mask.
Keep your distance:
  • If you are in a room with other people, keep a distance of at least 2 metres and wear a mask or face covering that covers your nose and mouth; and
  • People should wear a mask when they are in the same room as you.
Wash your hands:
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water;
  • Dry your hands with a paper towel or with a cloth towel that no one else will share; and
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
Cover your coughs and sneezes:
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze;
  • Cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow, not your hand;
  • Throw used tissues in a lined wastebasket, and wash your hands;
  • Lining the wastebasket with a plastic bag makes waste disposal safer; and
  • Clean your hands after emptying the wastebasket.
If COVID-19 symptoms develop while in self-isolation, get tested if eligible.

What happens if after the five days since symptoms started, the individual still tests positive on day six of symptoms but is feeling better? Do they need to self-isolate?

Testing for clearance is generally not recommended as test results may remain positive after the individual is no longer infectious. As long as the symptomatic or positive individual has completed the 5 or 10 days (as applicable to their vaccine and immune status), and their symptoms have been improving for at least 24 hours, they may discontinue self-isolation. It is important that they maintain masking, physical distancing and adherence to all other public health measures if leaving home.

Why is the government reinstating Directive #2?

While the risks for severe illness may be lower with Omicron than with other variants, it is far more transmissible, and hospitalizations are expected to continue to increase. placing greater pressure on our health system. Staff absenteeism is also expected to rise and affect operations in workplaces across Ontario due to Omicron infection and exposure, including in hospitals and schools.

Given increasing hospitalizations and the strain on health human resources, the Chief Medical Officer of Health is reinstating Directive #2 requiring hospitals and health care professionals to temporarily cease non-emergent and non-urgent surgeries and procedures in hospitals and in community settings so resources may be directed to.